BNZ Research

Our research team offers expert commentary on economics, foreign exchange, fixed interest and credit, to help inform your organisation’s risk analysis and decision making. 

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Currency Research

NZD Corporate FX Update

Jason Wong -
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From the current NZD/USD level at a year-to-date high, we see the balance of risk weighed to the downside over the rest of the year. However, a return to a sub-0.70 level is contingent on the (over-sold) USD staging a recovery, after its steady broadly-based decline over recent months.

A Delay to Expected NZD/USD Weakness

Jason Wong -
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- A pushing out of the expected recovery in the USD sees our near-term NZD/USD forecasts revised up, pushing out the expected fall in NZD/USD by a quarter. NZ’s terms of trade also look to be on a stronger path.
- Our end-Q3 NZD target is revised up a few cents to USD 0.71 and end-Q4 target nudged up a cent to USD 0.68. While the current NZD remains well below our short-term fair value estimate of around USD 0.75, there has been a wedge between actual and fair value all year. We aren’t expecting the NZD to rise much further over the near term. The gap is more likely to be closed by fair value nudging lower, than the NZD appreciating further.

The NZD’s recent strong appreciation from around USD 0.6865 just seven weeks ago has slowed as it approaches a key area of technical resistance around the 0.73 mark, a level it has yet to close above since February (using New York closes). After six consecutive weekly increases, the NZD could close this week down slightly.

NZD Corporate FX Update

Jason Wong -
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- The strong recovery in the NZD against all the majors over the past month corrects the pricing anomaly seen earlier in the year. A period of consolidation is now due.
- Our projection for the NZD to head down to USD 0.67 over the next 3-6 months is contingent on a rebound in US inflation that keeps the Fed on course to normalise policy.

What a difference a month makes. After earlier puzzling over NZD weakness in the face of strong fundamentals such as high risk appetite and rising NZ commodity prices, the NZD has staged a strong recovery. It remains below our short term fair value model estimate of USD 0.75 but we aren’t banking on the NZD making further gains. The NZD is close to key technical resistance levels and we think some consolidation is now due.

NZD/AUD Finally Recovers; What Next?

Jason Wong -
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- NZD/AUD recovered strongly by 4% in May, correcting the pricing anomaly we saw develop through March-April. Signs of a pothole in Australian growth and much stronger relative NZ/Australia commodity pricing goes some way towards driving the cross back towards a fairer value.
- Our medium-term outlook of an eventual move towards parity remains, based on the macro outlook continuing to favour NZ over Australia.
- After the strong recovery, the near-term outlook is now cloudier, but our central forecast is that a period of consolidation around the mid-90s should play out.

Our view on the NZD/AUD cross rate hasn’t changed, but given the big swing in that exchange rate this year, an update on drivers and thoughts seems appropriate. The cross began the year just over AUD 0.96, fell steeply from the end of January to mid-March to around AUD 0.91 and has since trended higher in a jumpy fashion to the current rate of just over AUD 0.95.

Peeling Back the Drivers

Jason Wong -
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- Traditional key drivers like risk appetite and terms of trade have not had their usual influence on the NZD so far this year. The lack of NZD carry seems to have had more influence and the market is, for now, giving due consideration to the RBNZ’s extended low rate guidance.
- US CPI and Trump’s questionable actions have recently clouded the outlook for Fed policy and the USD. The USD looks a little oversold at this juncture if one believes that ultimately political risks will fade and inflation will recover.
- Overall, while some fresh news has injected more uncertainty about the outlook, we remain comfortable with our year-end target of USD 0.67.

Currency markets are typically buffeted by a range of factors and half the battle is working out what the key driving forces are. Those forces tend to vary over time, come and go in terms of their importance, and new factors to consider pop up from time to time.

NZD Corporate FX Update

Jason Wong -
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- Commodity currencies have been out of favour over recent months and the NZD has been swept down, despite NZ’s softer commodity basket outperforming. Additionally, the RBNZ remains relaxed about the inflation outlook and the Bank is unlikely to rush into firmer policy guidance.
- short-term forecasts and leave our year-end target at USD 0.67 but flag downside risk to that as well.

NZD Looking Short-term Oversold

Jason Wong -
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- Over the year to date the NZD has underperformed, against economic fundamentals which have remained supportive. These include high risk appetite and strong NZ terms of trade. Net speculative short positioning is the greatest in nearly two years.

- Thus, there is a low hurdle rate for the NZD to recover over coming weeks and months. That said, ultimately see NZD/USD and NZD/EUR ending the year at 0.67 and 0.59 respectively. Economic relativities are expected to encourage NZD/AUD to gravitate to the mid 0.90s.

Economy Watch

Zero Inflation

Jason Wong -
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A soft CPI and a soft under-belly to the result suggest that the RBNZ won’t be in a hurry to join the ranks of other major central banks to remove policy accommodation. It anchors the short end of the rates curve around current levels and at least from a relative monetary policy perspective the Bank’s stance won’t be lending any support to the NZD.

Even Keel

Craig Ebert -
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New Zealand’s services sector stayed at a similar level of healthy expansion for June, according to the BNZ - BusinessNZ Performance of Services Index (PSI).

Steady Pace

Craig Ebert -
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New Zealand's manufacturing sector saw expansion continue to hover around expansion levels experienced over the last three months, according to the BNZ - BusinessNZ Performance of Manufacturing Index (PMI).

QSBO Still Pressing On (And Then Some)

Craig Ebert -
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- Q2 QSBO about as robust as it was last quarter
- So firm on growth, capacity constraint and inflation
- No news for the RBNZ as such
- But QSBO misses the fiscal/commodity thrusts
- While resilient to the impending general election

There were some unders and overs in this morning’s NZIER Quarterly Survey of Business Opinion (QSBO). However, overall, it remained consistent with robust growth, capacity constraints, as well as firmness in inflation.

Central Banks Stir as RBNZ Hibernates

Stephen Toplis -
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- RBNZ on hold for “considerable period”
- As BOC, BOE and Fed show signs of aggression
- We formally relinquish our Feb rate hike view
- As short term inflation indicators weaken
- Nonetheless, we remain mindful that capacity pressures continue to build

With some trepidation, we are now formally pushing back our expectation of a first RBNZ rate hike to mid-2018 from Q1 2018. There remains huge uncertainty around the timing of the move and we are certainly not ruling out a February rate hike. However, we now think looking for a May (or August) move is a better reflection of our central view of the RBNZ’s reaction function with equivalent risks of an earlier or later move. Our view remains significantly more aggressive than the central bank’s and modestly more so than market.

NZ Business Reality Trumps (Political) Uncertainty

Craig Ebert -
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- NZ businesses beefing up their optimism
- Despite the election and other supposed uncertainties
- Agriculture very much joining the party
- Capacity constraints are clearly biting
- Pricing gauges sustain 2%-plus inflation pulse

With the word “uncertainty” being bandied around a lot lately, and a local election fast approaching, the reality is that New Zealand’s business sector is full of confidence and expectation.

RBNZ Pleasingly Skirts a Dovish Tilt

Craig Ebert -
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- RBNZ leaves OCR at record low 1.75%
- And chary to the net-negative news since May
- NZD and wholesale rates little changed
- August MPS risks looking a little dovish
- But we leave our Feb hike call for now
- As capacity constraints pressure core inflation

As widely expected, the Reserve Bank of New Zealand left its policy interest rate unchanged at this morning’s OCR review, at a record low 1.75%. It also kept its language largely unchanged from last time. While we expected such a steady-as-she-goes approach, we did see a risk of the rhetoric tilting a fraction dovish, given the balance of news since the 11 May Monetary Policy Statement (MPS). But it didn’t, which we were pleased to see.

Outlook for Borrowers: Post June OCR Reveiew

Jason Wong -
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- With expectations of unchanged monetary policy for some time, wholesale floating rates and short-dated wholesale fixed rates should remain fairly flat through the rest of the year. A slight upward bias prevails due to upward pressure on bank funding costs. Next year, the possibility of higher wholesale rates increases as the first expected policy tightening by the RBNZ approaches.

- For those looking to hedge against rising rates, we see current levels of mid-long curve wholesale fixed rates at relatively attractive levels to do so. Risks appeared skewed toward higher rates later in the year.

Back On Track

Craig Ebert -
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New Zealand’s services sector returned to its recent level of consistent and healthy expansion during May, according to the BNZ - BusinessNZ Performance of Services Index (PSI).

Sailing Along

Doug Steel -
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New Zealand’s manufacturing sector saw expansion in activity lift during May, according to the BNZ - BusinessNZ Performance of Manufacturing Index (PMI).

Slow Q1 GDP Doesn't Deny Demand Pressure Developing

Craig Ebert -
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- Real Q1 GDP slows to 0.5%, 2.5% y/y
- Encouraging the view of RBNZ reservation
- But nominal GDP running at 6.2% y/y
- Just as capacity constraints begin to bite
- And we add demand to our GDP forecasts
- Pressure remains in view, in other words

We are not down in the mouth about today’s reported 0.5% expansion in March quarter GDP. Yes, it under-clubbed market expectations of a 0.7% gain and was even further below the Reserve Bank expectation of a 0.9% lift. That being said, we expected Q1 GDP to be this slow, largely on technical/timing issues. More to the point, we still think the economy is fundamentally pressing on, but as its room to expand is diminishing, because of capacity constraints. Budget measures will add to demand pressures.

For Better Or Worse?

Doug Steel -
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- Current account deficit unexpectedly widens
- But external accounts remain benign
- As net international liability position continues to shrink
- Nominal income growth looks strong
- But we have reservations for tomorrow’s real GDP
- Cyclone fueled food prices nudge our Q2 CPI pick higher

The annual current account deficit for the year to March 2017 was 3.1% of GDP. This was a bigger deficit than the 2.7% figure both the market and we expected and a push wider from the (upwardly revised) 2.8% result for calendar 2016.

Capacity Constrained!

Stephen Toplis -
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- Fiscal stimulus to boost growth
- But capacity constraints are binding
- Lack of land, labour, physical capacity and finance will strangle growth
- And, potentially, raise inflation
- We’re optimistic but warn against overly ebullient growth expectations

New Zealand’s economic environment is probably unique in the developed world. Whereas many nations continue to fend off the fallout from a protracted downturn, New Zealand, instead, is suffering from speed wobbles. A softening in economic growth looks almost inevitable but not because demand is set to weaken but rather because the economy is rapidly running out of the inputs required to keep the expansion on track.

High Terms of Trade Data Not Without Hooks

Doug Steel -
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There is a strong positive income pulse brewing in the NZ economy, courtesy of rising export prices and relatively subdued import prices. But this, being price driven, will not show up directly in quarterly real GDP figures that might well look a bit softer in the near term. We expect the terms of trade to remain elevated compared to history, while we judge the near-term volume weakness to be transitory.

The Politics of a Buoyant Business Sector

Craig Ebert -
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- May's business survey another strong one
- With inflation firming up squarely
- All pre the Budget's announced stimulus
- But beware election nerves creeping in hence
- RBNZ FSR telling of low-rate context

If New Zealand’s business sector is getting nervous about September’s general election, there was little sign of it in today’s ANZ business survey. Yes, net confidence – even with its 5 point increase in May, to +15 – is barely different to average, having been well above trend late last year. However, most every indicator regarding activity wriggled up, to a level further above trend. And the survey’s inflation gauges were now pointing to inflation of 2%, at least.

Government Has A Lot to Do With Pressure

Craig Ebert -
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Today’s Budget had a lot to do with pressure. Pressure to funnel some of surpluses back into the economy (in an election year); the pressure this will put on the economy’s resources, especially construction; all amid the ongoing pressure from a strongly growing population.

Commodity Winds are Now Tail Ones to Trade

Craig Ebert and Doug Steel -
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After a rough December quarter, New Zealand’s merchandise exports look to be rebounding quite well this year, while imports are largely maintaining their good momentum. So were the messages of this morning’s April trade account. And today’s milk price announcements by Fonterra were a further reminder that the commodity sector is now providing tailwinds to the economy, after cross-winds last year.

A Perfect Storm?

Doug Steel -
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New Zealand’s services sector experienced a sudden drop in expansion levels during April, according to the BNZ - BusinessNZ Performance of Services Index (PSI).

In Gear

Craig Ebert -
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While New Zealand’s manufacturing sector saw expansion in activity soften slightly in April, the sector remains in healthy territory, according to the BNZ - BusinessNZ Performance of Manufacturing Index (PMI).

RBNZ Dismisses Inflationary Developments

Stephen Toplis -
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We have witnessed rising inflation, rising inflation expectations, falling unemployment, a weakening currency and a strengthening global economy. We had thought this would rattle the Reserve Bank. As it turns out, it all seemed to have counted for little as the Bank left its stance unchanged from both its February and March missives.

New Zealand At A Glance

Craig Ebert -
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The New Zealand economy continues to perform well and we anticipate reasonable growth ahead. High immigration is playing a role but momentum is broad-based. Still, we believe the growth phase is broadly maturing/peaking.

Labour Market Still Booming in Everything But Wages

Craig Ebert -
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- Q1 labour market data generally strong
- But wage inflation still lagging, for now
- Nothing out of line with Feb MPS forecasts
- But next week's MPS all about the CPI track
- Hours affirm our caution around Q1 GDP

Will nominal wage inflation remain moderate, or is it bound to pick up? This is a key question for monetary policy, as we look to next week’s Monetary Policy Statement. In terms of activity there is no question that New Zealand’s labour market retains strong momentum, and is, at the margin, still tightening the screws. Be that as it may, wage and salary measures have not responded in their usual manner, or at least not quite.

Financial Markets Wrap

June a Good Month for Commodity Currencies

Jason Wong -
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- NZD, AUD and CAD all performed well in June
- Signs of coordinated major central bank guidance later in the month…
- …causes a significant sell-off in the rates market

An Overdue Recovery in NZD

Jason Wong -
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- NZD performs strongly in May, up 2½% on a TWI basis
- Supported by high risk appetite and rising NZ export commodity prices
- Downside bias to bond rates

Commodity Currencies Soft in April

Jason Wong -
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- The NZD continued its run of underperformance
- NZD TWI down 2% in April and 6% for the three months ending April
- Market-friendly French Presidential election outcome supports risk appetite and EUR

Interest Rate Strategy

Outlook for Borrowers - Post May MPS

Jason Wong -
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- Wholesale floating rates should remain little changed alongside a flat OCR through 2017; upside risk prevails through 2018 as an expected tightening cycle gets underway.
- Short-dated wholesale fixed rates should range-trade over the next couple of months, before facing gradual upside pressure in the second half as we move closer to a tightening cycle that is expected to begin in 1H18.
- Borrowers should be looking for dips in 3-5 year wholesale fixed rates to hedge exposure; we see upside pressure to mid-curve rates later in the year, largely reflecting global forces.
- Dips in long-end wholesale fixed rates should be actively considered as hedging opportunities, with risks skewed toward higher rates.

In the 11 May Monetary Policy Statement (MPS), the RBNZ reiterated its view that “monetary policy will remain accommodative for a considerable period”. The Bank saw the recent increase in inflation as transitory and believes that an unchanged OCR of 1.75% through to late 2019 will be required to generate headline inflation of 2% over the medium term.

Markets Outlook

BNZ Markets Outlook

BNZ Research -
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Even with signs that the NZ economy continues to perform relatively well, the prospect of slowing CPI inflation, aided and abetted by a cooling in the housing market, will only feed the reserved stance that the Reserve Bank reiterated last month. This is something for international punters to take most note of, even though the broader argument for rate hikes remains valid in our view.

Those Annoying Headline Grabbers

Craig Ebert -
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- Q2 CPI likely to “disappoint” with 0.1% (1.8% y/y)
- As the May MPS expected 0.3%, 2.1% annual
- But core inflation probably firming like the economy
- June PSI (58.6) strong like the PMI (56.2)
- Migration, tourism, dairy price info later this week
- Bascand’s talk; more financial than monetary policy?

Locally this week the focus turns to tomorrow’s Q2 CPI outturn. We expect a soft result of 0.1% q/q and 1.8% y/y (below the RBNZ’s pick back in May of 2.1% y/y, which didn’t have the benefit of knowing the recent tumble in oil prices). A soft result would support our view that the RBNZ isn’t likely to do an about-turn like the Bank of Canada recently did. We see the data reinforcing the RBNZ’s decisively neutral policy stance for some time. If anything, inflation is tracking below its projections, given the combination of a stronger NZD and lower oil prices.

Inflation Moderates Again

Craig Ebert -
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- Construction constraints will adversely impact manufacturers
- Tourism constraints to intensify
- Consumer confidence buoyant
- House price inflation to moderate further
- Food price jump offset by petrol price fall

We are forecasting next week’s Consumers Price Index to rise just 0.1% over the June quarter which will result in annual inflation nudging below the magical 2.0% mark to just 1.8%. This is lower than the 0.3%/2.1% combo that the Reserve Bank had in its May Monetary Policy Statement (MPS), largely due to the recent slump in petrol prices.

Leading From the Front

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- BCA reckons RBNZ in the group to hike next
- Which tomorrow's QSBO is likely to reinforce
- Especially with its messages of capacity constraint
- But the RBNZ looks set to keep OCR at record low
- Credit, QVNZ, commodity prices, Crown accounts due
- But also watch for Barfoot's June housing results

As much as the RBNZ looks set in a holding pattern, we have the likes of heavyweight research house, BCA, putting the NZ central bank in the group most likely to hike next. While this doesn’t infer any immediate move, it is a collective that includes the Bank of Canada, which is now (rather suddenly) expected by the market to hike later this month. While we have a lot of sympathy with the BCA view – and representative, as it is, of some global views currently affecting NZ markets – we just as surely point out that the RBNZ would appear unconvinced.

Capacity, Commodities and Construction

Doug Steel -
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- Businesses still upbeat?
- As capacity issues press
- Oil to dent near term inflation
- And add to already strong terms of trade
- May exports expected higher
- Building consents to bounce in May?

Data releases in New Zealand are relatively sparse this week. But what is on offer will provide more fodder to contemplate the growth and inflation implications of three important current themes namely capacity constraints, commodity price movements and construction activity.

Steady As She Goes

Craig Ebert -
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- RBNZ to reiterate steadiness at OCR review
- As positives and negatives weighed
- Our Feb-hike call looking too soon?
- Even with OCR presently half its neutral level?
- PSI/PMI each signal above-trend growth

We expect that the Reserve Bank will stick with its steady-as-she-goes tone at Thursday’s OCR review, while leaving its cash rate at a record low of 1.75%. To be sure, there has been some key news that the 11 May Monetary Policy Statement (MPS) hadn’t figured on. But the ups and the downs are probably offsetting in respect to OCR baselines.

NZ GDP Having Technical Issues

Craig Ebert -
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- We expect Q1 GDP expanded 0.5% (2.4% y/y)
- But expectations within a credibly wide range
- Capacity constraints coming to the fore
- External accounts a non-issue for Q1 and after
- May's (ECT) transactions clang with a 0.2% dip
- Also due this week: May's FPI, PMI (and REINZ?)

For Thursday’s March quarter GDP report we have toned down our growth expectation to a quarterly 0.5% (2.4% y/y). But we are at pains to point out the unusually wide range it could conceivably fall within. And this is not so much about the market range of 0.1 to 1.1%, with a median expectation of 0.7%. It’s more about the range of outcomes that we perceive as quite conceivable.

Q1 GDP Growth Looking More Moderate

Craig Ebert -
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- We prune our Q1 GDP pick to 0.6%, from 0.7%
- Wholesaling (like retailing) robust
- But Q1 building dip is a big, albeit once-off, weight
- Tomorrow's Q1 manufacturing might also disappoint
- Barfoot's data affirm slowing Auckland housing
- Commodity prices looking robust, still

A little bit like for Australia, there are question marks about how robust Q1 GDP will be in New Zealand as well. The negative from the Building Work Put in Place outweighs the positive from Wholesaling, such that we are today revising down our expectation for Q1 GDP growth to 0.6% (verging on 0.5%), from 0.7% (verging on 0.8%).
Our final call on Q1 GDP growth will depend, as usual, on the last statistical piece of the jigsaw, the quarterly manufacturing sales and inventory data. These are due tomorrow morning. We expect them to infer a strong bounce in manufacturing production, after weakness in Q4 that we judged as once-off.

Eyeing A Record

Doug Steel -
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The NZ economy continues to perform well. The latest broad indicator will come via Wednesday’s ANZ business survey. While its confidence index moderated to about average in April, respondents maintained a strong outlook regarding their own activity, employment, investment and profitability. With this there have been signs of stretched capacity and a firming intent to raise prices. We haven’t seen anything in the past month or so to change this narrative, so we expect May’s edition of the business survey to reiterate these broad themes.

A Choice Looking Budget

Craig Ebert -
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It’s all looking choice for Thursday’s Budget. New Zealand’s fiscal trajectory is looking more and more positive. This is thanks to a long efficiency drive on the part of government spending, along with solid tax-flow from a robustly expanding economy. However, as this is an election year – and a tight looking one at that – there’s added pressure to funnel some of the surfeit back into the economy

Unpredictable

Craig Ebert -
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- McDermott speech to expand on RBNZ reserve?
- A neutral stance but with OCR well below neutral
- Retail trade keeps booming in Q1
- April's slow PSI intriguing; PMI still strong
- Q1 business prices to show broader inflation
- April's tourism numbers up about 25% y/y?

Who was it who said never make predictions, especially about the future? They obviously didn’t work in the markets, where some sort of view – whether implicit or explicit – is often essential in order to navigate the way ahead. And to compare and contrast with others’ views. But as a reminder that we never quite know even the undercurrents of the economy, as a starting basis, this morning’s retail trade figures blew everyone out of the water. Even accounting for population growth, they remained rapid.

Warning: Explicit Tightening Bias Ahead

Stephen Toplis -
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- Higher cash rate demanded
- As inflation and inflation expectations rise
- Labour market nears full employment and NZD weakens
- RBNZ to prevaricate with modest shift to tightening bias
- We move our hike call forward to February

There is no excuse for the cash rate to be just 1.75% in New Zealand. But odds are the Reserve Bank will find one when it delivers its May 11, Monetary Policy Statement. As we see it: inflation expectations are elevated and rising; growth is at or above trend; capacity constraints are intensifying; headline and core inflation are around the mid-point of the Reserve Bank’s target band; the currency is proving to be weaker than anticipated; and commodity prices are pushing New Zealand’s Terms of Trade to near record levels. All of this argues for the cash rate to be a lot closer to neutral than where it currently is.

Labour Market Powering Through the Crosswinds

Craig Ebert -
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- HLFS to continue its jagged improvement in Q1
- But needs cross-checking with QES and LCI reports
- RBNZ inflation expectations survey now due Friday
- Dairy price recovery levelling off?
- April's QVNZ housing report…another mixed one?

If we are not so sure about what figures the HLFS will throw up for the March quarter, we are confident about the broad trajectory of New Zealand’s labour market. Based on the staffing indicators we look at we get a clear sense of above-average momentum.

Markets Today

BNZ Markets Today

Doug Steel -
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It was all about the Fed overnight with markets relatively subdued ahead of the 6am decision. In the wash up we see the US yields and US dollar lower. Equities are a touch higher and oil prices have extended gains.

BNZ Markets Today

Doug Steel -
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It was a bit of a snooze fest in markets overnight, with generally little movement and tight ranges across currencies. US yields and the US dollar are marginally higher, halting their recent declines. Equities are little changed, while oil prices bounced.

BNZ Markets Today

Doug Steel -
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It was more of the same for currencies and bonds on Friday, the US dollar continuing to push lower alongside US Treasury yields. Equities were mixed, while oil prices fell.

BNZ Markets Today

Brendan Marsh -
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We open this morning to a dominant theme of further extensions to USD weakness for most currency pairs and relatively limited change to most bond and equity markets though the path has been strewn with wet rocks and tree roots - tipping my hat to the weather outside in our verdant city. The NZD continues to defy any suggestion that the market is overly long, rising to challenge resistance just above 0.7400 overnight in step with most of its peers.

BNZ Markets Today

Brendan Marsh -
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After our tumultuous Tuesday session markets appear to have hit the pause button, seemingly moving sideways over the past 18-24 hours. A closer look though does reveal for the most part an ongoing decline for the USD on most pairings, still hurting from the implosion of US health care reform. There is in most instance further favour shown for equity indices and commodity prices.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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There have been some significant swings in currency markets, with most of that occurring during the local trading session, with overnight trading more settled. Global rates are lower.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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It has been a quiet start to the week, with low volumes and no significant market movements, although commodity currencies are on the soft side. Locally, attention will turn to today’s CPI data, while globally the key release is Thursday night’s ECB meeting.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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The focus for the market on Friday was the much-anticipated US CPI release. Core CPI inflation surprised to the downside for the fourth consecutive month, with the annual increase of 1.7% remaining at a 2-year low. There was a trifecta of soft economic releases, with retail sales and consumer sentiment also underwhelming, the latter falling to a 9-month low.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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The NZD and AUD have outperformed for the second day running on a day where risk sentiment is slightly improved, with the VIX index back down to 10 and bond yields are higher.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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Equity and bond markets alongside the NZD and AUD have been well supported after Fed Chair Yellen’s testimony, while the CAD has surged after the Bank of Canada kicked off a tightening cycle.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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The USD is under pressure this morning following some damning headlines for Trump’s team, and that has reduced the damage to the NZD seen over the past 24 hours. EUR has been the key beneficiary.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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It has been a very quiet start to the week. The holiday season and a lack of news have meant little movement in markets, especially currencies.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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Friday’s focus was the US employment report but other factors stole the limelight, with CAD, GBP and JPY the biggest movers on the day. The global bond market sell-off continued, but this didn’t perturb US equities, with the strong payrolls report signalling robust economic growth.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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After pausing for breath over the past few days, the major bond-market sell-off that was kicked off last week has returned, driving equities lower and creating headwinds for the NZD and AUD.

BNZ Markets Today

Doug Steel -
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Generally quiet trading conditions prevailed overnight with data ahead of the FOMC minutes that were released at 6am this morning. Not much changed post the minutes. Equities are little changed on the day, US bond yields are marginally lower and the US dollar is marginally higher.

BNZ Markets Today

Doug Steel -
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Markets were relatively quiet overnight, as the US observed its Independence Day holiday. There was a hint of risk off following yesterday’s North Korean missile test (its 11th of the year, but its first inter-continental). Asian equity markets dipped. Euro Stoxx 50 closed down 0.35% overnight. JPY initially strengthened before settling back. USD/JPY opens this morning down 0.1%, around 113.20.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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Markets have begun the second half of the year on a positive note, supported by positive economic indicators. The Euro Stoxx 600 was up 1.1% while the S&P 500 index closed a shortened session before the Independence Day holiday up 0.2%. Global bond rates continued to nudge higher, while the USD was stronger across the board.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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It was a fairly uneventful end to an eventful week on Friday. There were plenty of data releases to chew over, but there was little market reaction to them, with end of month and quarter rebalancing dominating any flows.

BNZ Markets Today

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The coordinated, less dovish, tone of major central banks remains at the forefront of mind for investors, driving a good old-fashioned sell-off in the bond market and equities. In the risk-off environment, the NZD is the worst performing currency, alongside a still-soft USD.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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In a week with little top-tier data so far, central bankers remain in the driving seat for markets. They are outlining a more positive tone about the outlook and signalling removal of monetary accommodation, supporting the CAD, EUR and GBP.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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A day that looked quiet on paper has turned out to be newsworthy. In currency markets, European currencies have surged, led by EUR on hawkish comments by ECB President Draghi, while the NZD has underperformed. Bond yields are higher across the board, driven by Draghi’s comments and this has helped drag down equity markets.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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After a quiet week last week we’re on track for another one and it’s a struggle to write anything meaningful today. There have been only a few bits and bobs to report and that is reflected in modest market movements. Currency movements against the USD have generally been within 0.2%, with a notable exception being a soft yen. UST yields have nudged lower after some soft data.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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The low vol environment continued on Friday, with only modest changes in bonds, equities and currencies. The USD ended the week on a soft note for no particular reason. Strong new home sales data were ignored. Trump returned to the spotlight with his admission that he never taped his conversations with former FBI Director Comey. This was widely seen as another blow to his credibility as investigators continue with their probe into allegations of his obstruction of justice and associations with Russia.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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The low volatility environment continues, with only small changes in currencies, equities and bond markets. CAD, NZD and NOK are the only notable movers, supported by data and central banks.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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On a quiet day in a quiet week, currency, bond and equity movements have been small. Commodity currencies have underperformed a little as oil prices continue to get smashed, while GBP has been in focus after another MPC member outlines his views.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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With no global economic releases of note, traders were focused on central bank speakers, with the BoE’s Carney’s comments helping drive a weaker GBP. The only other point of interest overnight was a further fall in oil prices.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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It’s all looking pretty good out there, with global equities showing solid gains, helped by a positive turnaround in the US tech sector and no releases of US data – which have shown an underwhelming run recently – to spoil the party. Argentina plans to issue 100-year bonds, a country that has defaulted five times in the last century, at less than 8%. It must be a bull market.

BNZ Markets Today

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Soft US data saw the USD unwind some of its post-FOMC gain and helped nudge yields lower. US consumer confidence undershot expectations, falling to its lowest level since the November Presidential election, while housing starts and permits were also soft. The USD was already on a descending trend before the data were released, and the USD majors index ended the day down about 0.3%, falling on all the major cross rates.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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The moves seen in the aftermath of the Fed’s tightening of monetary policy yesterday have extended, with the USD finding supporting and UST yields drifting higher. US equities are softer and the VIX index is higher.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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Some much information, so little space and time. The combination of very weak US CPI data and the FOMC Statement with accompanying press conference has seen a big swing in UST yields and the USD.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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In the currency space, GBP and the CAD remain in the spotlight, with both showing good gains against the USD. But markets are generally treading water ahead of the FOMC announcement due tomorrow morning and UST rates are little changed.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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With little economic data to speak of, politics and central bankers have driven currencies, which sees GBP remaining under pressure and the CAD leading the charge.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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In currency markets, the only price action of note on Friday was the plunge in GBP as soon as exit polls showed a likely inconclusive and therefore shocking election result.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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Two of the three major risk events for this week have now passed with no adverse market reaction so focus now turns to the UK election, where the first exit polls will be released from about 9am. The NZD continues to outperform, while the USD has also been well bid, although currency movements have been modest. US equities are flat, while global bond yield movements have been divergent.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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It has been another slow news day as traders await the three key risk events for the week, beginning with the ECB meeting tonight. Equity markets are fairly flat and global bond yields have nudged up from recent lows. CAD and AUD book-end the currency leader board, with CAD weaker on lower oil prices and AUD higher on economic data.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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On a slow news day, markets have worked themselves into a bit of a tizzy, with fear over the outcome of the three key events scheduled for Thursday. This has seen global bond rates fall, demand for the safe-haven yen, and slightly softer equity markets.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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It has been a fairly sleepy overnight session in markets, with US equities tracking sideways around recent highs, small changes in global bond yields and modest currency movements except for a notable outperformance by the AUD. For locals returning after a long weekend, much of the price action occurred after the soft US employment report on Friday night.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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The first day of the month kicked off with some positive US economic news and higher oil prices that have lifted the USD, UST yields and US equities.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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There’s been plenty of newsflow to digest but, again, market movements have been fairly modest. As the month draws to a close, the S&P500 is down slightly, weighed by the energy sector as oil prices show a chunky fall; and the financial sector as a couple of major banks report softer revenue. The low market volatility and lower Treasury rates environment has made it tough to make money. As we go to press, the WSJ is flashing a headline that former FBI director will say President Trump asked him to back off Flynn probe in his testimony to the Senate committee next week.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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There has been plenty of newsflow to digest but the low volatility environment has continued after the long weekend in the US and UK, with only modest price changes across equities, bonds and currency markets.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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With the US, UK and China on holiday, market trading is thin and there has been little change in pricing.

With no data to speak of, focus turned to central bank speakers. In a speech in Asia yesterday, the Fed’s Williams reaffirmed his view that a total of three interest-rate increases makes sense this year (including March’s rate hike). While a non-voter, he is often seen to be aligned with Fed Chair Yellen, whose view in response to the recent run of softer US data remains unknown.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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It was a quiet end to the week ahead of the long US weekend, with US equities flat, UST yields little changed and a flat USD. Economic data released had no impact on the market. They showed a modest upward revision to US Q1 GDP to a still-underwhelming annual rate of 1.2% and soft core durable goods orders.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -

It was a quiet end to the week ahead of the long US weekend, with US equities flat, UST yields little changed and a flat USD. Economic data released had no impact on the market. They showed a modest upward revision to US Q1 GDP to a still-underwhelming annual rate of 1.2% and soft core durable goods orders.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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US equities are probing fresh highs, led by the consumer discretionary sector on positive retail reports, and the VIX index is probing sub-10 levels. However, the risk-on environment hasn’t supported the NZD as it weakens a little alongside other commodity currencies on much weaker oil prices. UST yields have traded in a tight range.

BNZ Markets Today

Doug Steel -
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Central bank comments generated the most action overnight. But generally subdued trading conditions prevailed through most of the night with limited movement across many markets ahead of this morning’s Fed minutes.

BNZ Markets Today

Doug Steel -
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Markets moves were generally within tight ranges overnight, with a modestly pro-risk undercurrent. US equities are currently up smalls (+0.2%), following mostly positive closes across Europe. US bond yields have pushed a bit higher while oil prices nudge upwards. The USD is firmer.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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The NZD tops the leaderboard, on a day with little economic data or fresh insights. US equities continue to recover from their hit mid last week, supported by defence stocks, as President Trump signed an arms deal with Saudi Arabia worth more than $100b. The S&P500 index is up 0.5%, while the VIX index continues to fall from last week’s spike and is now down to around 11.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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It was a fairly uneventful trading session on Friday, with little data to speak of. Trump remained in the headlines, with fresh news about his conversations with Russian officials and investigators identifying a current White House Official as a “person of interest” in their probe of Russian influence on the election. After the close, former FBI Director Comey agreed to testify before a Senate Committee.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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Markets are in a calmer mood following the big risk-off move the previous day. After the chunky 1.8% drop in the S&P500 yesterday, it is up 0.8% for the day, while the VIX index has fallen from around 15.5 to 14.5. The USD has recovered as well. Much of the positive movement has been attributed to a Zero-Hedge report which highlighted an earlier testimony by former FBI director Comey, where he said that “he had not been pressured to close an investigation for political purposes”. This might get President Trump off the hook.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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With no top tier data to focus on this week, it was inevitable that Trump would regain the spotlight. And so it is, with the “dodgy” revelations of Trump allegedly asking FBI Director Comey to drop a probe of his former national security advisor – an impeachable offence according to some. This follows the recent firing of Comey and reports of Trump passing on secret intelligence to Russia. All this adds further distraction to Trump’s pro-growth policy agenda, which has yet to, and may never, get off the ground.

BNZ Markets Today

Doug Steel -
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Equity markets are little changed, while oil prices are marginally lower following yesterday’s jump higher. US long bond yields are down a couple of points. More movement was seen in foreign exchange markets.

BNZ Markets Today

Doug Steel -
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Oil prices jumped higher mid-afternoon yesterday after energy ministers of Saudi Arabia and Russia said they favoured extending oil production cuts by nine months to the end of Q1 2018. Major oil-producers are scheduled to meet later this month. After starting the week around US$50.80, Brent crude oil prices immediately leapt higher then extended gains overnight to above $US52.50 before settling back under $52 currently; up 1.9% on the day.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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Amidst a number of economic releases on Friday, only softer US inflation and retail sales data managed to move the market, resulting in a weaker USD and lower UST yields.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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US equities are down slightly with no fresh news to push them beyond their recent record level, while the VIX index has nudged up further to around 10.5. Global bond yields have shown only small changes, while in the currency market the NZD and GBP are weaker after central bank policy statements.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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Commodity currencies take out the top four places in the daily leaderboard following a strong bounce in oil prices. Other currencies show little change and bond and equity markets are quiet.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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The USD and UST yields continue to head north as the market becomes more convinced of Fed hikes ahead. There have been no top tier data releases in the US this week, but Fed speakers have been in force and the general message continues to be one of little change to the economic outlook, despite the soft Q1 GDP data. The Fed’s George saw risks from delaying gradual rate hikes. Both George and Rosengren favoured beginning the process of balance sheet normalisation this year.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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The week has begun with slightly improved risk sentiment, which sees the VIX index below 10, global equity markets reaching fresh highs and higher global bond yields

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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Early reports this morning suggest that Macron has decisively beaten Le Pen by about 65-35% in the second round of the French Presidential election, as expected. This sets the scene for positive risk sentiment as the new week begins.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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This week’s theme has been weakness in commodity prices, driving down the commodity currencies, and that has continued overnight. Global commodity indices like the Bloomberg index and CRB index have made fresh lows for the year. A range of metal prices has been slammed, iron ore prices are limit down, and oil prices are down around 5%. WTI crude is flirting with USD 45, back to the level prevailing before OPEC’s supply agreement was initiated at the end of November.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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Trading activity was light ahead of the FOMC announcement this morning. Economic data had little impact on the market. The US ISM non-manufacturing composite was better than the market expected, but the USD had already main some modest gains ahead of that release and there was no further push higher. Euro area GDP growth of 0.5% q/q in Q1 was in line, confirming the robust growth picture in the region.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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Market movements have been modest ahead of tomorrow morning’s FOMC statement. Currency movements against the USD are all within +/- 0.4% for the day, while the NZD has outperformed modestly.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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With much of Europe and Asia on holiday, trading conditions have been light. US equities are up slightly, the VIX has fallen to near-historical lows and the NZD and AUD head the leaderboard.

BNZ Markets Today

Jason Wong -
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A plethora of data was released on Friday, but there was little sustained market reaction to any of it. Currencies, equities and bond yields all showed little movement for the day. Markets have become immune to President Trump’s jingoistic outbursts, seeing them as a negotiating tool than given any serious credence. On Friday, Trump commented that the US could have a “major, major conflict with North Korea” if diplomacy didn’t work, but the market didn’t take much notice. Early Saturday, reports came through of another failed test missile launch by North Korea.

Rural Wrap

Primary Prices Performing

Doug Steel -
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- Primary product pricing generally firm
- 2017 goods exports expected to lift by over $3b
- Farm spending rising cautiously
- Debt repayment on the agenda too
- Very high terms of trade an economic boon
- Sets the scene for a buoyant National Fieldays

Many primary product prices are not only higher than a year ago but they also currently sit above their 5-year average. It’s a positive sign for incomes. To the extent that farmers spend the additional cash, it will be a boost for economic activity. But there are also debt repayments and saving to consider. In any case, it is good to have options.

Strategist

BNZ Strategists

BNZ Research -
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Could it be that the jinx of being in government in a year ending in 8 is about to end?

Strategist

Craig Ebert -
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In an otherwise robust-looking NZ economy, we continue to wonder about where the housing and construction markets are going to end up, given their extremely stretched starting points. That’s not to say we are forecasting a big dip, although the risks of such are there. In respect to monitoring trends in the housing market, we welcome the Real Estate Institute’s new SPAR house price indices. These look to give the best signal-to-noise ratio of the many house price measures out there. Their June outcomes, published this morning, proved about as soft/flat as we expected regards Auckland, and for the rest of the country perhaps not as robust as we figured on. The more immediate issue for inflation, however, is next Tuesday’s Q2 CPI report. With the recent drop in fuel prices, we now expect this to increase just 0.1%. This would drag its annual inflation down to 1.8%, from 2.2% in Q1. While this might be viewed as a disappointment by some, just don’t forget to check the various core inflation measures too, as these have been firming up more recently.

BNZ Strategist

Stephen Toplis -
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With the word “uncertainty” being bandied around a lot lately, and a local election fast approaching, New Zealand’s business sector is in fact full of confidence and expectation. Today’s ANZ business survey provided the latest proof. Far from doing a nervous Nelly, its net confidence index strengthened to +25 in June, from +15 in May. Own-activity expectations burgeoned to +43, from +38. These results are consistent with annual real GDP growth in the order of 4%. Not that the economy will be able to achieve such a strong degree of expansion as that, with capacity constraints already biting on most fronts. This is starting to seriously limit the wherewithal to grow, even though the demand side indicators are pushing hard for it. In this we continue to ask questions of those who judge that the economy is not only devoid of resource pressures but is still running some spare capacity. We believe next Tuesday’s NZIER Quarterly Survey of Business Survey will very much support our view.

BNZ Strategist

Craig Ebert -
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We are not down in the mouth about today’s reported 0.5% expansion in March quarter GDP (2.5% y/y). Yes, it under-clubbed market expectations of a 0.7% gain and was even further below the Reserve Bank expectation of a 0.9% lift. That being said, we expected Q1 GDP to be this slow, largely on technical/timing issues. More to the point, we still think the economy is fundamentally pressing on, but as its room to expand is diminishing, because of capacity constraints. At the same time, we have today finalised the extent of extra demand impetus through our GDP forecasts (which was still a work in progress at the last Strategist). Much of this stems from the 25 May Budget. This has mainly meant for more sustained growth in private consumption expenditure, with a particular push in calendar 2018. All considered, we now forecast real GDP growth of 3.1% for 2018 and 2.4% for 2019. Pre the Budget (of 25 May) these were 2.5% and 1.8% respectively.

BNZ Strategist

BNZ Research -
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There is a strong income pulse brewing in the New Zealand economy, courtesy of rising export prices and relatively subdued import prices.

BNZ Strategist

Craig Ebert -
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New Zealand’s real GDP story still has many moving parts to contemplate. Construction could take a technical dip in Q1, for instance. On the other hand, dairy production is primed to rebound over the coming season. This will limit the 2017/18 milk price (we are sticking with our forecast of $6.00, with Fonterra scheduled to make its first forecast within days). Still, it represents one of many commodity income impetuses coming through. This was evident in the Q1 producer price (PPI) data, with its 4.1% y/y pace. The PPI also highlighted ongoing heat in construction inflation. In this vein, the RBNZ seems to require housing-related inflation to be/stay strong, in order to achieve its 2% CPI target. The Q1 OTI report (1 June) will likely show the terms of trade pushing 44-year highs. The Budget (25 May) will be full of stimulus but afforded by surpluses – to the extent that debt ratios keep falling. The RBNZ Financial Stability Report (31 May) will no doubt devote a lot attention to housing market excesses, especially with dairy industry vulnerabilities abated.

BNZ Strategist

Craig Ebert -
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The New Zealand economy continues to perform well and we anticipate reasonable growth ahead. High immigration is playing a role but momentum is broad-based. Still, we believe the growth phase is broadly maturing/peaking. We forecast annual NZ GDP growth to slow to 2.7% this year and 2.5% in 2018. This is after posting a creditable 3.1% expansion in 2016. Activity was modestly disrupted by the 14 November Kaikoura earthquake but, ultimately, this will add to (re)building activity. In addition to immigration, economic momentum is coming from a robust labour market and investment cycle, commodity income (including a decent recovery in dairy income), soaring tourism, and improving global growth. Generally speaking, consumer confidence is robust and business expectations strong. Indeed, they suggest we might yet be too conservative with our GDP forecasts for the coming period.